Volume 4 no 3

Happy People Work Better

Volume 4 Number 3 In This Issue

EDITORIAL: Achieving joy in Canada’s health care system: what can we do today?

Johny Van Aerde, MD, PhD

“We have chosen a profession that invites those who are ill to share their suffering, stories and worries, and that gives us the privilege to serve and help in removing or preventing some of the burden(s)” (p. 4).1 This touches on the highest aspirations any profession can wish for in a society. Yet, although such professional purpose should lead to a high level of satisfaction, we hear and read much more about burnout, distrust, and lack of engagement than we do about joy. read article

Turning burnout into joy

Mamta Gautam, MD

Burnout is reaching epidemic proportions. Although it’s important to identify burnout and understand the causes, we have to stop blaming doctors for becoming burned out and recognize it as a systems issue. There is a growing trend among health systems and other employers of physicians to adopt both individual and system-level interventions and develop a model of shared responsibility. read article

Transforming health care through systems and stories

Cheryl Heykoop, DSocSci, and

Guy Nasmyth, PhD

To address challenges in Canada’s health care system, change is required. Systems thinking, including an awareness of interconnectivity, system boundaries, and the influence of perspectives, can help us to be prepared for change; yet it must also inform effective action. Taking action, or intervening in a system, requires a focus on letting go of ineffective attitudes, processes, hierarchies, policies, and paradigms.  read article

Five fundamentals of civility for physicians: Part 2

Michael Kaufmann, MD

This second of two articles on the fundamentals of civility for physicians focuses on communication, self-care, and responsibility. Adopting these behaviours empowers us to take responsibility for our own well-being which, in turn, enables us to do and be our best under all conditions. read article

The continuing challenge of patient-centred care

Michael Gardam, MD, and

Judith John, BA

Why is patient-centred care (PCC) not embraced by physicians who clearly want the best for their patients? PCC is desired by patients, takes no more time to provide, and can result in better outcomes. We believe that physicians are hesitant to adopt PCC because it has been imposed from “outside.” Growing evidence suggests that engaging patients can improve outcomes — for the patient, the family, and the clinician. read article

Could Saskatchewan become the best place in the world to practise medicine?

Susan Shaw, MD, and Ivan Muzychka

Over the last 18 months, the Saskatchewan Medical Association has been leading discussions and actions around health system redesign. This work, which continues to evolve as the environment changes, aims to maximize opportunities to strengthen not only relationships within the system, but also the role physicians can and should play to make Saskatchewan the best place in the world to practise medicine and receive care. read article

Accountability and trust: sitting on a three-legged stool

Darren Larsen, MD

Professional accountability is balanced and well supported on a three-legged stool made up of patients, clinicians, and the health care system. All three legs must be strong, and pressure must be exerted equally and oppositely through each of them at all times. Strength and stability of the stool is enhanced by building trust in our partnerships through consistent displays of trustworthiness. The challenge for physicians, patients, and the government during periods of critical change is to create processes that allow safe displays of honesty, integrity, and reliability and acknowledge them when they occur. read article

Physician leadership development through the lens of LEADS and competency-based education

Ming-Ka Chan, MD, Celia Rodd, MD, Elisabete Doyle, MD, Eleanor MacDougall, MD, Jenette Hayward, MD, and Karen Gripp, MD

Leadership development for health care professionals has received increasing emphasis globally, with a focus on starting training early and continuing throughout the career life cycle. In this case study, we review the current milieu of physician leadership education opportunities in pediatrics at the University of Manitoba, showcase some exemplars, and discuss enablers and challenges. read article

STORIES FROM OUR CCPES: Journey into the unknown

Gary Ing, MD

We asked CSPL members who are Canadian Certified Physician Executives (CCPE) to tell us something about their “path” to leadership:  what inspired them, how they succeeded, what they’ve learned.  We hope that their experiences will provide you with food for thought on your leadership journey.  read article

STORIES FROM OUR CCPES: My leadership journey

William Sischek, MD

We asked CSPL members who are Canadian Certified Physician Executives (CCPE) to tell us something about their “path” to leadership:  what inspired them, how they succeeded, what they’ve learned.  We hope that their experiences will provide you with food for thought on your leadership journey.  read article

BOOK REVIEW

The Future of the Professions

How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts

Oxford University Press, 2017

Richard Susskind and Daniel Susskind

Reviewed by Johny Van Aerde read review